Cringe Georgian voice lines

I’m sorry, the Spanish voice lines are also kinda cringe, (Santiago!) but that’s part of the fun of it I guess

I don’t see how the Georgian language being wrong is any different from the other languages being wrong

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Portuguese (And its numerous dialects) is a developed form of Latin having various different catalysts and influences differing from other developed forms of Latin. Yes, you are a Latin speaker of sorts. I would not try to use that to pass a language examination. You can claim that it is distinct enough from classical Latin to easily be its own language, no one would contest that take either. This is why the term romance language is better.

I wish they would fix at least some of the worse ones (Byzantines, Berbers and Aztecs at the very least, hopefully Goths as well).

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Just curious, where do the speakers sound like they’re from? American? I can’t imagine there are many non-native speakers of Georgian out there.

What’s wrong with that one? The cringe is subjective I guess, but at least it’s not obviously wrong or out of place like OP’s example or some of the other civs’ lines.

This is likely true though. The only realistic path for change is probably to make a mod, have enough people use it, and hope the devs one day make it official. Although even if you do, there’s the chance they’ll give it the Persian architecture treatment (i.e. do nothing).

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Which wouldn’t be a big surprise.

I counter that: Sassa!

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There are also erroneous lines for the Franks, which often denotes the profession instead of the action. Example: “lumberjack (bûcheron)” instead of “cut wood (couper du bois)”

Same for Saracens. Perhaps it’s a weird stylistic choice?

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I think its intentional

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I think every civ in vanilla had that thing where they named the profession instead of the action. Actually most civs do that in Age of Empires 3 too.

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I never cared that Lumberjacks said chopper. I just took it as them accepting the terms of their employment.

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What’s wrong with Saracens’ lines?

Exact same thing as the comment above me.

When you select a village and click on gold/stone the villager says gold/stone mine worker. And when you select a villager and click on wood the villager says wood chopper or lumberjack. So instead of mentioning the resource they’re collecting they mentioned the name of the person who would collect such resources.

Although thinking about it now I’m not sure if it would be more normal for them to just say gold or stone or wood.

Edit:
Not that I have a problem with that, I’m just noting the pattern that the Georgians aren’t the only civilisation that mention the name of their job instead of the resource when you click them to that resource.

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It seems there is not a standardized way of refering to resource gathering

Britons say “Chopper” (The one that “chops” wood)
Spanish say “Talar” (To cut-down)
Teutons say “Holza/Holzer” (To cut wood)

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Holzer is bavarian dialect for forest worker. Don’t see how it could mean something like ‘‘to cut wood’’. Maybe in some very old german dialect or something? Just wonder where your infos come from :wink:
But yes, i think the concept how they create the Age of Empires languages is very loose. But that worked for me since AoK. Many of us have their weird sounding ingame counterparts haha :smiley:

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The AoE wiki (20 characters)

ah nice thank you. The wiki says it’s ‘‘middle high german’’ but i can’t find the word directly in the middle high german dictionary. anyway thanks for your answer :slight_smile:
In modern germany it is used as a bavarian dialect word for ‘‘Waldarbeiter’’ (forest worker) as i said.
‘‘Holz’’ is german for wood or lumber. So both meanings are not too far away haha :smiley:

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As a french, I’d add up “Bastissor”

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I’d say South Germanic, we use it as well in Rheinfrankisch/Platt, maybe in Elsassisch as well (not sure). Likewise we use some words (apparently) of Boarisch contrary to the northern dialects, such as “gel” interjection, and pronounce the “a” as “o” (like we say “wos” instead of "was…).

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